DIOSPYROS MALABARICA (Desr.) Kostel

Dioscorea peregrina (Gaertn.) Gurke., Dioscorea embryopteris  Pers., Embryopteris peregrina  Gaertn.
Family: Ebenaceae

Bengali/vernacular name: Gab, Deshi gab, Makur-kendi, Kala tendu.
Tribal name: Gab gaith (Tanchangya); Kar Pong (Murong).
English name: Gaub persimmon, River ebony.

Description of the plant:
A small to medium-sized evergreen tree with short, much fluted, knotty and warty trunk and bushy crown. Leaves coriaceous, 10-28 cm long, oblong or oblong-lanceolate, obtuse. Male flowers in drooping cymes containing 2-7 flowers. Female flowers larger, 2.5 cm across, usually solitary, axillary, drooping. Fruit subglobose, yellow, 3.8-7.5 cm across.

Using information:
Fruits and stem bark is astringent. Ripe fruits are oleagenous; cures biliousness, stone in urinary tract. The unripe fruit is acrid, bitter and oleagenous; chewing of fruit cures blisters in mouth. The juice of the fruit is used as an application to wounds, ulcers and diarrhoea; infusion is used as a gargle in aphthae and sore throat. Seeds are given as an astringent in diarrhoea and dysentery. Clayx and peduncle of fruit is used in the treatment of coughs and dyspnoea. Flowers and fruits are given in hiccup of children. Bark is good for dysentery, diarrhoea and intermittent fever. Wood cures biliousness (Yusuf et al. 2009).


DIOSPYROS MALABARICA
DIOSPYROS MALABARICA (Desr.) Kostel


EtOH(50%) extract of stem bark possesses antiprotozoal, antiviral and hypoglycaemic activities (Asolkar et al., 1992).

Chemical constituents:
Leaves contain triterpenes, betulin, β-sitosterol, oleanolic acid and myricyl alcohol. Bark, flowers and fruits contain tannins. Bark also contains myricyl alcohol, triterpenes, betulinic acid and saponin. Fruit pulp contains alkanes, triterpenes, β-sitosterol and its glucoside, betulin, betulinic acid, gallic acid, hexacosane, hexacosanol and a new monohydroxy triterpene ketone. Seeds contain 32% fatty oil, β-amyrin and betulinic acid. Stem contains β-sitosterol and a leucoanthocyanin. Roots contain glycosides (Ghani, 2003; Rastogi & Mehrotra, 1993).

Distribution:
Occur in village groves throughout the country.